Hear This All People And Give Ear – Hymn Lyric

Reflect on the temporary nature of wealth. This hymn urges us to listen and learn from life's lessons. Let us seek wisdom and purpose beyond material possessions.

Hear This All People And Give Ear – Hymn Lyric

Reflection on Life’s Temporary Wealth: Hear This All People And Give Ear. In this thought-provoking hymn, the writer encourages everyone, regardless of social status, to listen attentively. He warns against the false security that comes from relying solely on wealth, emphasizing the transient nature of worldly possessions. Ultimately, he reminds us that true fulfillment lies in wisdom, character, and the impact we have on others, rather than in material wealth.



   

Hear This All People And Give Ear – Hymn Lyric

Hear this, all people, and give ear,
all in the world who dwell;
Both low and high, both rich and poor,
together listen well.

I with my mouth variety
of wisdom will impart,
And prudent knowledge rising from
the musing of my heart.

To an instructive parable
I’ll first incline mine ear;
And then will with my song and harp,
My mystery declare.

Why should fear in evil days
when the iniquities
Of my stray feet surround me with
hosts of calamities?

[ Part]

Those men that make their great estates
their stay whereon to trust,
Or in th’ abundance of their wealth
who confidently boast;

Yet none of them his brother can
by any means redeem,
Neither to GOD can ever pay
a ransom meet for him.

So dear his life’s redemption is,
that bought it cannot be;
That he should still for ever live,
And not corruption see.

For they must see that wise men die,
the fool and brutish too,
All perish, and their great estates
to others leave they do.

They think their houses ever stand,
and dwelling places shall
Last to all ages; and their lands
by their own names they call:

But such men in their honour set
Continue but a night;
And like the beasts are soon cut off,
And quickly perish quite.

This way of theirs their folly is:
and yet their mouth and way
Their sons approve, and will pursue;
like foolish sheep are they.

They in the sepulchre are laid,
and death shall them devour;
But in the morning over them
the just shall have the pow’r.

And from the houses where they dwell,
The beauty now they have.
Shall utterly consume away
in the corrupting grave.

But GOD my soul will from the pow’r
ev’n of the grave redeem;
And he will surely me receive
to live in bliss with him. (Selah)

[ Part]

Be not disturb’d when thou dost see
riches to any flow,
Nor when the glory of his house
abundantly does grow.

For he shall carry nothing hence,
when death his days shall end;
Nor shall his glory after him
into the grave descend.

Tho’ he his soul doth greatly bless,
while he on earth does live;
And when thou to thy self dost well,
men will their praises give;

Yet in their fathers steps they tread;
and when like them thy die,
Their wretched ancestors and they
in utter darkness lie.

For man how great soever here,
unless he’s truly wise;
As like a sensual beast he lives,
so like a beast he dies.

   

Meaning of Hear This All People And Give Ear

Hear This All People And Give Ear: A Reflection on Life’s Temporary Wealth

In the hustle and bustle of our daily lives, it’s easy to get caught up in the pursuit of wealth and material possessions. We see those around us boasting about their great estates and abundance of riches, and sometimes, it can make us feel small and insignificant. But let us take a moment to reflect on the true nature of these worldly possessions and the lessons they can teach us.

The writer of this hymn, in his wisdom, urges us all to listen attentively. He wants us, regardless of our social standing or economic status, to take heed of the messages he is about to share. With great humility, he promises to impart the knowledge that has arisen from his introspection and contemplation.

He begins by presenting a parable, a story that carries a deeper meaning. It serves as a warning against relying solely on our wealth as a source of security. “Those men that make their great estates their stay whereon to trust” may seem invincible in their abundance, but they are ultimately faced with the fragility of life.

No amount of riches can save a person from the clutches of death. In fact, the writer poignantly expresses that “None of them his brother can by any means redeem, neither to God can ever pay a ransom meet for him.” The value of a person’s life is immeasurable, and no amount of money can prolong it indefinitely.

The writer challenges the notion that material possessions bring lasting fulfillment. He emphasizes the transient nature of earthly goods, stating, “So dear his life’s redemption is, that bought it cannot be; that he should still forever live, and not corruption see.” Death is the great equalizer, affecting both the wise and the foolish, the rich and the poor. All perish, leaving their wealth to be inherited by others.

The folly of those who believe in the eternal nature of their wealth is exposed. They build houses, name their lands after themselves, and live in the illusion of permanence. But, as the writer states, “Such men in their honor set continue but a night; and like the beasts, are soon cut off and quickly perish quite.” Their legacy fades away, like the beauty of their homes that “shall utterly consume away in the corrupting grave.”

It is humbling to consider how often we mirror the actions of these foolish individuals. We admire and follow in their footsteps, never questioning the true significance of their wealth. We become like sheep, blindly pursuing worldly possessions without realizing the emptiness they ultimately bring.

Yet, in the midst of these reflections, a sense of hope emerges. The writer acknowledges that God has the power to redeem our souls from the clutches of the grave. “But God my soul will from the power even of the grave redeem; And he will surely me receive to live in bliss with him.” There is salvation beyond worldly wealth, a promise of eternal life in the presence of God.

So, as we navigate through this world, let us not be disturbed or envious of those whose riches flow abundantly. We should not place our trust in material possessions, for they are fleeting and will ultimately fade away. Instead, let us focus on cultivating true wisdom and understanding.

As the hymn reminds us, “For man how great soever here, unless he’s truly wise; As like a sensual beast he lives, so like a beast he dies.” The true measure of a person’s worth lies not in their wealth, but in their wisdom and moral character.

In the grand scheme of things, riches are temporary, but the lessons we learn and the impact we have on others can endure for generations. So, let us strive to live purposefully, seeking knowledge, and embracing the teachings that go beyond material wealth.

In conclusion, the hymn “Hear This All People And Give Ear” serves as a powerful reminder to look beyond worldly riches. It urges us to question the value we place on material possessions and to seek fulfillment in things that truly matter. Let us remember that while wealth may bring temporary comfort, it cannot save us from the embrace of death. It is our wisdom, character, and the impact we have on others that truly define our legacy.

 

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Freely Shareable Hymn Inspired Image Reflect on the temporary nature of wealth. This hymn urges us to listen and learn from life's lessons. Let us seek wisdom and purpose beyond material possessions.

 

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