The Waters In Unto My Soul – Hymn Lyric

Discover the powerful hymn "The Waters In Unto My Soul" as the writer cries out to God for salvation amidst overwhelming challenges. Find hope in God's deliverance and restoration.

The Waters In Unto My Soul – Hymn Lyric

In this hymn, titled “The Waters In Unto My Soul,” the writer expresses their deep anguish and cries out to God for salvation. The waters symbolize the overwhelming troubles and challenges that have engulfed the writer’s life. They feel like they are sinking in a muddy deep, with no ground to stand on. The floods of despair overflow them, and their soul is weary from crying out for help. They long for God to come to their rescue and save them from the depths of their troubles. Despite their hardships, the writer’s faith in God remains unwavering. They find solace in knowing that God hears the cries of the poor and will come to their aid. Their ultimate hope is in God’s salvation and restoration, both for themselves and for their land.



   

The Waters In Unto My Soul – Hymn Lyric

The waters in unto my soul
Are come, O God me save.
I am in muddy deep sunk down
Where I no standing have;
Into deep water am come,
Where floods me overflow.
I of my crying weary am,
My throat is dried so:
Mine eyes fail for my God I wait.
They that have hated me
Without a cause, than mine head’s hairs
They more in number be.
Also mine enemies wrongfully
They are that would me slay,
They mighty are; then I restored
What I took not away.
O God, thou know’st my foolishness,
My sin’s not hid from thee.
Who wait on thee, Lord God of host,
Let not be shamed for me.
O never suffer them who do
For thee inquiry make,
O God of Israel, to be
Confounded for my sake.
[]

By reason that I for thy sake
Reproach have suffered,
Confusion my countenance
Hath over covered.
I as a stranger am become
My brethren even unto,
Unto my mother’s children I
An alien am also.
For of thy house the fervent zeal
Hath quite up eaten me:
And on me their reproaches fell
That have reproached thee.
In fast I wept, and spent my soul;
This was reproach to me.
And I my garments sackcloth made,
Yet must their proverb be.
They that do sit within the gate,
Against me speak they do:
Unto the drinkers of strong drink
I was a song also.
But I in an accepted time
To thee Lord make my prayer:
O God, me in thy saving truth,
And in much mercy hear.
[]

Deliver me out of the mire,
And me from sinking keep:
Let me be freed mine haters from,
And out of waters deep.
Overflow me let not water floods,
Nor me let swallow up
The deep, and let not thou the pit
Her mouth upon me shut.
Jehovah, hear thou me, for good
Is thy benignity:
After thy mercies multitude
O turn thy face to me.
And from thy servant hide not thou
Thy countenance away,
Because that I in trouble am,
Hear me without delay.
O draw thou nigh unto my soul,
Redeem thou it likewise:
Deliver me because of them
That are mine enemies.
Thou my reproach hast known, also
My shame, and my disgrace;
Mine adversaries everyone,
They are before thy face.
[]

Reproach mine heart hath broke, I grieved:
I sought some me to moan,
But none there was: and sought for some
To comfort, but found none.
Instead moreover of my meat
They gave unto me gall;
They gave me vinegar to drink
To quench my thirst withal.
Their table let before their face
To them become a snare;
And let it be a trap which should
Have been for their welfare;
Their eyes let darkened be likewise,
That they may never see;
With trembling also make their loins,
To shake continually.
Pour out thine ire on them, let seize
On them thine anger fell.
Their palace let be desolate,
None in their tents let dwell.
Because they do him persecute
On whom thy stroke is found:
Also they talk unto the grief
Of them whom thou dost wound.
Do thou to their iniquity
Iniquity more add:
Into thy righteousness for them
Let entrance none be had.
Out of the book of living ones
O do thou them forth blot:
And them amongst that righteous are
Be written let them not.
[]

But I, O God, am poor and sad;
Let thy health lift me high.
With song I’ll praise the name of God,
With thanks him magnify.
Unto Jehovah this also
Shall be more pleasing far,
Than any ox or bullock young
That horned and hoofed are.
This thing when as they shall behold,
Then shall be glad the meek:
Also your heart shall ever live,
That after God do seek
Because the Lord the poor doth hear,
Nor’s prisoners doth despise:
Let heaven, and earth, seas him praise, and all
That move therein likewise.
For God will Judah’s cities build,
And Zion he will save’
That they may dwell therein, and may
In in possession have.
And of his servants then the seed
Inherit shall the same:
Also therein inhabit shall
They that do love his name.

   

Meaning of The Waters In Unto My Soul

In this hymn, titled “The Waters In Unto My Soul,” the writer expresses their deep anguish and cries out to God for salvation. The waters symbolize the overwhelming troubles and challenges that have engulfed the writer’s life. They feel like they are sinking in a muddy deep, with no ground to stand on. The floods of despair overflow them, and their soul is weary from crying out for help. They long for God to come to their rescue and save them from the depths of their troubles.

The writer also faces persecution and mistreatment from their enemies without any just cause. The number of people who hate them and seek to harm them seems to surpass the count of the hairs on their head. These enemies, who are mighty and powerful, have wrongfully accused and attacked the writer. Yet, the writer remains steadfast in their faith and trusts in God despite their difficult circumstances.

The hymn reveals the writer’s close relationship with God, as they confess their foolishness and sins to Him. They trust that God, the Lord God of hosts, will not let those who wait on Him be ashamed because of the writer’s actions. The writer prays that those who seek God’s guidance and help should not be confounded or embarrassed because of the writer’s situation.

The writer feels like a stranger even among their own family and relatives. They are alienated from their brethren and their mother’s children. The fervent zeal for God’s house has consumed the writer, leading to reproaches and insults from others. The writer’s devotion to God has caused them to weep and pour out their soul in fasting, yet they have become the subject of mockery and songs among those who drink strong liquor.

In their distress, the writer turns to God, seeking His salvation and truth. They appeal to His abundant mercy and implore Him to deliver them from the mire and the deep waters that threaten to overwhelm them. The writer longs to be freed from their enemies and asks God not to let the floods of water engulf them. They plead for God’s intervention, asking Him to keep the pit from shutting its mouth over them.

The writer continues to beseech God, acknowledging His benevolence and asking Him not to hide His countenance from them. They plead for God’s attention and deliverance from their adversaries. The writer is painfully aware of the reproach, shame, and disgrace they have endured because of their enemies. They appeal to God, their righteous judge, to intervene on their behalf and mete out justice to their oppressors. They pray for their enemies to experience the same pain and suffering they have endured.

With a broken heart, the writer seeks solace and comfort but finds none. Instead of receiving nourishment, they are given gall and vinegar to drink, adding to their suffering. The writer desires for their enemies’ table to become a snare and a trap, leading to their downfall. They pray for their adversaries’ eyes to be darkened and for their loins to tremble constantly. These pleas for justice against their enemies reflect the deep hurt and anguish that the writer has experienced.

The writer’s trust in God remains unshaken, even in their time of extreme distress. They believe that God will punish their enemies according to their iniquities. They pray for their adversaries to be removed from the book of the living, never to be mentioned among the righteous. The writer recognizes their own poverty and sadness but chooses to praise and magnify God’s name through song and thanksgiving. They understand that their heartfelt worship is more pleasing to God than any offering of livestock.

The writer concludes the hymn with a declaration that those who seek God and trust in Him will find gladness and life. The Lord hears the cries of the poor and does not despise those who are imprisoned or oppressed. The writer calls for all of heaven, earth, and the seas, along with all living creatures, to praise God. They believe that God will restore and save the cities of Judah and allow His servants to inherit the land. They proclaim that those who love God’s name will dwell in the promised land and enjoy the blessings of His presence.

In “The Waters In Unto My Soul,” the writer expresses their deep anguish and yearning for God’s deliverance in the face of overwhelming challenges and persecution. Despite their hardships, the writer’s faith in God remains unwavering. They find solace in knowing that God hears the cries of the poor and will come to their aid. Their ultimate hope is in God’s salvation and restoration, both for themselves and for their land.

 

Freely Shareable Hymn Inspired Image

I hope this hymn inspired image brings you hope and peace. Share it with someone who needs it today!

Freely Shareable Hymn Inspired Image Discover the powerful hymn The Waters In Unto My Soul as the writer cries out to God for salvation amidst overwhelming challenges. Find hope in God's deliverance and restoration.

 

Join the Prayer Warriors Community!

Sign-up for our newsletter and embark on a transformative journey with Prayer. Enter your email below and become a part of our Prayer Warriors family.